Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Wed Jan 07, 2015 3:21 am

Bruce - have had a number of enquiries regarding the reproductions. Packaging the items for shipping is going to be the biggest hassle. Will probably do an initial run of 5 bumpers and 3 bonnets for club members.

Josh - the bonnet and bumper have turned out way better than I could have achieved so I'm glad I paid the money to get those done right. Now the challenge is to see if I can build the moulds for my guards :)
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby aus jd 2703 » Wed Jan 07, 2015 3:33 am

bonnet wings? spoiler, wind deflector. what ever you want to call it I need one!
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Wed Jan 07, 2015 3:47 am

Yes I know and now that I have the guards, I will be looking at the moulds soon. Need to finish the bumper cut outs and get my friends car out of my garage before I start making a very large mess building the moulds. All this stuff takes time and I'm back at work already.
Bonnet spoiler will be done the same time as the guards
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby bmt » Wed Jan 07, 2015 9:28 am

Those bonnets and bumpers look so good almost makes me wish I had a St185 instead of a St165!!

Ah yes shipping. One of my friends imported a fibreglass repro bonnet, some guards, and bumper for his Audi from a guy in Sweden. It turned up on a pallet with little more than shrink wrap to hold it together. I was surprised at how well that turned out for him. No damage at all. I guess if guys are keen overseas it would be much better for them to organize a group buy. You could stack them up on a pallet to help reduce costs.
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Wed Jan 07, 2015 5:28 pm

I was talking about local sales with the NZ Toyota Celica GT-Four Owners Club re: the bumpers. Have looked at shipping options already and sending stuff by the pallet is far more economical :)
I won't do overseas sales for the bonnet and bumper. Not worth my time or hassle. Plenty of people have the parts which they could get moulded and reproduced locally to them. It is just a matter of money to make it happen
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby bmt » Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:43 pm

Fair enough.
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Wed Jan 07, 2015 7:35 pm

I take it from this perspective. There is no money to be made for me as the cost per unit is high enough that adding on any profit margin would work out to be a token payment at best. The only way to make money off it would be to do the work myself, but then it eats my time, which I want to use differently, rather than do low paying labour and would reduce the quality as I don't have the expertise nor material resources like the professionals do.

The investment I have made into getting the moulds made is for the various GT Four / Celica ST18x owners in NZ who want to have a little something special. To break even, I have to move 41 units of bonnets/bumpers and that is only if I charge a token admin fee for my time to organise and chase around the packaging and logistics.

If I wanted to do overseas sales, then it would not be for financial reasons. I would easily run a loss if I went down that road. For some smaller things I am looking at, I may provide for overseas buyers, but only as group buys (for others, don't bother asking what I'm doing as I don't know when I'll get around to doing it)

A number of people want parts, but when it comes to the money for bespoke items, they want the best for the cheapest price, and that doesn't work in the bespoke world. And the variations of the GT-Four are unique enough to be considered as bespoke from my view (unless various engine mechanical which is shared with the MR2), so filling a need from a production standpoint is not economically viable if someone wanted to turn a profit on items which are time and labour intensive to produce.

Anyway, that is just my world. Others will support the platform in small quantities as required, but I will only do things that benefit me as the priority and maybe there is something for others as a result.
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Wed Jan 14, 2015 4:35 am

In a bid to catch up on all of the photos, I'm going to break down the work into months to break down the task of documenting the build into months. Sorry if some stuff gets repeated, but I can't be bothered going back to see what I have and haven't posted up. Last major update was up to the end of 2011 so..

January 2012

Cleaned up rocker cover and painted it.
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Kept disassembling the body, removed various clips and gave the panels a wipe down
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Started figuring out the brake lines and bias valve. I suspect at the time I also finished up the seam sealing in the engine bay.
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String to start aligning the prop shaft as the engine wasn't in so no real point of reference.
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Re-assembled the rear brake drum pads. Tip, use a small pair of pliers to help push in this washer as you twist the washer under the retention pin.
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Clamp also helps hold things in place if you are doing it by yourself.
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Rotate the hub so the access hole is over the pad retention pin, use the pliers to position the washer, push in then turn under the pin.
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After one pad is in, keep on reassembling. Use pliers to get the top springs over the centre post. Ensure your adjuster is in at the bottom.
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New swaybar links. Decided to go for factory standard with the whiteline adjustable swaybar before going to adjustable swaybar links. Would complicate the setup if I added too much too soon.
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Decent allen key set and spanners make life easier when installing the swaybar links. I also have a 1/2" hex socket set which I use for more torque as needed.
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Torque up various arms
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Rear setup complete except for mounting the brake caliper.
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Tip. Mount the caliper and use a screwdriver in the vent to stop the hub rotating when torquing the cv nut. Works with larger rotors, prob won't work for standard rotors. Hand brake generally won't put enough pressure on the inside of the rotor to stop the hub rotating.
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Nick came around and helped chuck the wheels on and cut down my extended studs for the front hubs.
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New bushes, links, ball joints and cleaned up the sway bar mounting brackets.
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A-arms with new bushes and cleaned up. Swaybar painted red.. like a fire engine..
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After cutting the studs, Nick cleaned up the threads with the die set.
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Extended studs pressed into the hub.
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New steering rack boots.
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Rack joints were very clean, showing little wear. Left them as they were.
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New tie rod ends
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Starting to assemble the front suspension.
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New steering rack bushes.
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Righto, end of January with progress in replacing worn items, refurbing brackets and test fitting various parts
GT Four Adovansu "I want to enjoy the powerful and nimble agility behavior."

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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Thu Jan 15, 2015 10:07 am

So February 2012 was a busy month. 121 images strong so lets get into it.

Talking with my friend Leigh and his father Tom some years back, the plan was to change the fuel and brake hardlines for copper nickel pipe.
Also known cupronickel pipe or bundy tube, the pipe comes in rolls and can be bend into various shapes to replace factory hardlines as long as you use the right fittings.

I decided to re-route the brake hardlines which go to the bias valve to clean up the aesthetics of the firewall as it looked a bit cluttered. hindsight says I shouldn't have bothered as you generally can't see lines behind the engine and manifold. Oh well...
Cool thing about copper nickel is that even if it is bent, you can generally bend it back into a straight and start again, as long as it isn't bent heavily on a 90 degree angle. Straightening a 90 is not easy to achieve.

Requirements are the correct size pipe, tube cutter and flaring tool.
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Cut pipe by rotating cutter around the pipe, scoring the pipe on a couple of rotations, then tighten, then rotate a couple of times again. Repeat until pipe is cut.
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Using a flaring tool, flare the end of the pipe (normally a double flare for a better fit and that is the factory spec). Fitting is placed on the pipe before flaring.
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And then you have a nicely flared pipe with the fitting.
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A hand held bender is normally used, and this one uses a wheel with different sized grooves for the different sized pipes. There are other pipe benders, but this ampro model seemed reasonably compact. You can also bend by hand.
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Straightening out the pipe as best as possible, I put fitting on, flared the pipe and gave it a slight bend.
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And slowly but surely bend a little, bend a little more, figure out the angle, bend some more. Diagram helps to figure out what goes where.
Note, I used the factory pipe brackets.
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And slowly getting there.
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Open head spanner is best for tightening up and unscrewing the fittings. It is quite a mission to straighted a pipe that comes in a coil. Length is determined by using a tape measure and tracing out the path of the pipe. If the pipe length is short, you can use a joiner or start again. I commonly started again and reused the old pipe for smaller length pieces.

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And lines to the bias valve complete.
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And they fit with the factory brackets.
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If you want to fit a brake booster bracket, you have to change or bend this pipe to the side. Challenge is to make sure there is no interference with the cam cover as the distance between the booster and cover is around 20-30mm? (can't remember exactly) There is a very narror space is what I can remember.
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And something new to allow a brake booster bracket to fit.
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When I was removing things out of the engine bay, I was very rough and bent the fuel and rear brake lines to get them out of the way when I was cleaning up the seam sealer. I didn't realise that once the steel lines are bent, they don't bend back easily. I also didn't realise there was another bracket on the underside of the car. Way to make more work for myself. Will get back to it in a moment.
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Just some general photos. Engine with caldina intake and CT26R2 (CT20B)
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Replaced rocker cover gasket ensuring to use goo in the corners as per BGB
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Comparison between st205 and 215 throttle bodys. This is why you can't just swap the TB position sensor over. Different mounting and locater dowel.
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ST215 TPS on left, ST205 on the right.
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ST215 TPS is 3 pin, ST205 TPS is 4 pin.
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ST215 TB on left, ST205 TB on right. Rear of TBs shown
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ST215 TB on left, ST205 TB on right. Front of TBs shown
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While I was disassembling the engine ancillaries, I bent the pipe from the water pipes to oil cooler. Thanks Hose from Hell.
I got a hardline pipe from a ST202 as a replacement but found that this pipe facing upwards interfered with the sensors on the water junction.
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Many pipes make light work. Got a replacement pipe and it came with a Gen3 3sgte block.
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Unfortunately my replacement pipe was rather pitted as they must have removed the pipe with a screwdriver and damaged the flange. They had a lot of goo between flange and water pump outlet to ensure no leaks.
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Changed the gasket on the oil cooler (warmer..)
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New HTH's installed. I polished the pipe a little as well.
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Broke one of the bolts on the oil cooler mounting flange. Too much torque with a 3/8, so tightened by hand. Later I bought a 1/4 drive torque wrench for these low torque jobs.
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Made a rolling frame for my engine and gearbox. Designed the frame so the engine sits just above the legs of the engine crane to allow the crane legs to be moved around easier as I'm pushing around the engine.
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New spark plugs. Did I mention I found an old spark plug below the brake booster? Must have been an old one which got left in the engine bay as they prob couldn't reach it.
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New thermostat
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Had to reuse the gasket. No significant wear or tear, so just cleaned it up and reinstalled.
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Engine brackets, 2x st202, 1x st205. Smaller brackets make things tidier in the engine bay. Will use them to install engine into car, then remove them once engine is in the car.
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The mighty crank pulley holder. Holder is bolted on to the pulley and then the crank pulley tightened through the hole while holding pulley in place. Built the tool to also do Subaru EJ crank pulleys as I had to change the cambelt on the Forester.
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Sandwich plate for an oil cooler. Changed this to a better design (you will see later). These plates still require thermostats as they commonly don't have thermostatic control built in.
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That will do for now and only gets me to the 4th of Feb..
GT Four Adovansu "I want to enjoy the powerful and nimble agility behavior."

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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Fri Jan 16, 2015 12:10 am

Fun thing about living close to a pick a part scrapyard, is the fun stuff that comes through the yard. I probably mentioned it before, but this is a 1998 5SFE short block I removed from a car (in the rain..) for ~$150. Idea was to look to do a stroker later. Job at the time was to attach the gearbox to the engine. I didn't want to re-use the flywheel cover from the old engine as it was damaged from transit and was looking a little worse from wear. Nick comparing the 3S cover to the 5S cover.
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3S cover over the 5S cover. 5S cover is slightly larger, so Nick scribbed a cut line to fit the cover for this application.
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On to the grinder to cut back
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And test fit against the gearbox
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Time to take the engine off the stand
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Place engine onto rolling frame, ready to attempt the gearbox to engine union (marriage, mating, partnership - insert adjective of your choice)
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Engine off the stand also allowed me to fix a bolt I broke off when changing the rear crank seal.
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Remove bolts, cut away sealant, remove crank seal housing, clean up sealant, reinstall with new sealant and new bolt
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3SGTE flywheel skimmed at a local engine rebuilders for $50 (about that price i think)
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Comparison with 5S flywheel.
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Mount flywheel and torque bolts using crank pulley tool to stop crank rotation - very handy tool this..
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Align clutch to flywheel. I remember this issue (sigh). Borrowed a flywheel alignment tool off a friend but it didn't have the correct size to align the clutch properly. Thickened the alignment tool using electrical tape, then measured with ruler to align, but it was a bit dodgy. Ended up buying a clutch alignment tool which worked better than that the first tool. Wasted hours trying to do a relatively straightforward job (cue recurring theme with any car project)
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Removed stickers on clutch plate then cleaned up residue
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Once clutch aligned, torqued bolts - job done
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next issue - release bearing and clutch fork. The gearbox shop previously lost my clutch fork. I got a replacement (on right), but the release bearing wouldn't fit on to the fork with the supplied retainer clip. So back up to the scrapyard and managed to get a fork from a standard 3S and it worked out :)
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Differences between cast iron and pressed forks.
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Release bearing in place
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grease the outer shaft for the release bearing and the pivot point of the fork
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And clutch fork installed. Test the bearing by pushing on fork and
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bearing moves as it should
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attach the grommet
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and sweet as..
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Last edited by DeeCee on Fri Jan 16, 2015 12:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Fri Jan 16, 2015 12:12 am

The Union - suffice to say, anyone who has done this knows the challenge in achieving the engine to gearbox union. Helps that I have a crane and balancer for a start.
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Many many many attempts were undertaken to try and get the gearbox on to the engine. Engine on the balancer, gearbox on the balancer, rotate this way, that way etc etc. Was up to 4am trying to get this done
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You'd get to a point and the gearbox wouldn't go on any more. So close yet so far away.
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Start again
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Wake up, have a shower/food/coffee, dread the prospect of making this happen.
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Check alignment again. Attempts last night moved clutch plate :(
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Remove the clutch, time to re-align. Nick actually read the instructions for a tool..
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Time to attempt the missle silo method. Laid out some carpet on the garage floor, measured the difference between the crank pulley and cam cover then got a couple of blocks of wood to allow the engine to sit relatively vertical. Jonno, Nick and I carefully tipped the engine on to the cam/crank pulley end, ensuring that little pressure was put on the edges of the crank pulley for fear of breaking those edges. Wow, it sits on that end of the engine quite nicely.

Reorientate the straps on the gearbox, lift and rotate and move over the engine to mount.. (fingers crossed). Jonno and Nick were actually quite surprised about this method. First time I had done the Union, so it was all an experiment for me.
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We successfully got the box aligned and moving down, but we couldn't get the box on properly, there was always about 15mm left to go. Someone on a board had previous said that a mounting point stuck out, which was commonly ground off to allow the transfer case to slip on. Guess what, the transfer case was hitting the aforementioned mounting point.
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Bye bye mounting point..
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It is so little tolerance in there, mere milimetres between block/pan and transfer case. Anyone had luck rotating the gearbox while mating to the engine to rotate the transfer case into position? How do you get your gearbox on?
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removing the mounting point just made the job that much simplier!
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Success!
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And just in case, I had a spare cam cover from a gen3 3sge. Will put some holes in it later for the cam pulleys
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GT Four Adovansu "I want to enjoy the powerful and nimble agility behavior."

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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Fri Jan 16, 2015 12:13 am

Time to fix up those lines. Released the hardlines from the various brackets and covers and reviewed the position of the lines.
Note, this pic is to see if that utility hole was covered by the lines, and unfortunately it was. Original plan was to put quick release plug in that position, but with hardlines going over it, the use of that utlity hole for anything was a no go.
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Fuel line was pretty creased from over bending - oops on my part. Figured out what the factory routing of the line was relative to the fuel filter.
original plan was to change fuel filter to a smaller unit and tuck it out of the way, but after looking at options, it was easier to replace filter and reuse the factory bracket for mounting. I may still change the mounting as required.
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this is the oops - no good for fuel, need to fix
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using tube cutter, i cut back the pipe
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using a flexible hose will save me :) Also allows fuel filter to be located elsewhere as requried.
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cut line needs some flaring so pipe doesn't pop off.
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Jonno used to pop over regularly to help/laugh. His subaru legacy acting as a tripod coming off the driveway.
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You wondering why people roll their inner guards?
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So pretty..
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time to reinstall the steering rack. Mounted column internally and put a Nardi steering wheel on.
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Chucked the rack on to the crawler and mounted.
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time to test fit an engine. Engine sits on frame between crane legs. Rolling frame design works a treat. Mount old bumper bar to left car car over the engine.
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Start to slowly move engine under the car.
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Richard getting a bit of a workout pushing the engine into place.
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Check the location of engine relative to the body before lowering.
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Slowly lower car over the engine, adjust the engine location to ensure nothing snags or gets hung up. Engine needs to be slowly rolled forward to ensure the PS pump and gerbox position selector doesn't snag on the A-arms as the car is lowered down.
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Holding the car up mere centimetres off the ground while moving the engine around - so close..
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Engine relative to the side mounts wasn't right. Tilted the car up a little to be able install the drivers side mount
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You can see how close the mount is here. go a little this way, that way, shake it around a little..
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time to move the engine up a little to get the mount into position.
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And engine finally sitting in the engine bay, at least on the side mounts.
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Wheel studs again. Must have takent his picture for some reason. stud, 2nd from left was cut too short. ended up having to buy another stud to cut down btw
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And that was February 2012
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby bmt » Fri Jan 16, 2015 6:03 am

Good job! :notworthy:

I feel like such a slacker!! I need to get back to posting!
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Fri Jan 16, 2015 6:08 am

But I'm only catching up on my slackness. I mean, these are photos from nearly 3 years ago..
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Re: Project Elephant: DeeCee's GT4A

Postby DeeCee » Fri Jan 16, 2015 9:41 am

March 2012

So with the engine mounted, it was time to look at the front and rear engine inserts from SpeedSource.
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As you can see, the rear mount hole is offset.
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Front inserts have the hole in the centre so it was an easy decision to put them straight in to the front mount bracket. Smear with lube
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Lube the pin as well
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Also got these solid bushes from SpeedSource as well. Front comparison
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Rear comparison
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Replacement bolts supplied as well
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To mount the subframe, I had to get the car on stands. Easiest thing is to lift the car with the crane
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After some mucking about trying to get the subframe in, I figured that you have to tilt the engine forward. Easiest way I found with the engine hanging on the side mounts, was to push the driveshaft yoke up with my hand from underneath. The engine has to sit in a more upright position so I jury jigged a tie down to tilt the engine forward.
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Test fit the bracket in place. The mount is offset to centre of the gearbox bracket so the inserts only fit in one way.
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And a test fit of the insert lines up with the bracket.
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Insert in
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To orientate the rear offset insert with the bracket, I put half the insert with the centre pin in place. This allowed me to move the insert by hand to line up the mount and the rear bracket
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Subframe mounts in, rear bush bolted in.
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Slightly out of order, but I took the insert apart to demonstrate the technique
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Due to the tight fit of the pin inside the insert, you need to push the pin out. I used a large bolt and a hammer
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Subframe bushes are placed between the body and subframe. Generally a lot of mucking about to get it all lined up.
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GT Four Adovansu "I want to enjoy the powerful and nimble agility behavior."

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