New Camshaft Break-in procedure.

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New Camshaft Break-in procedure.

Postby C-dubb » Fri Sep 07, 2012 4:33 pm

How have those of you who have replaced or upgraded camshafts gone about break in? Reading the cam card that came with my GSC power division cams it says NOT to use synthetic oil for the break in because of the properties of ductile steel billet blah blah blah. So I've already started the vehicle with said cams installed...with an oil pan full of Mobil1. I am wondering if I may have already compromised the new camshafts and if I should even bother draining the synthetic oil and going through the motions with conventional oil...running it through two heat cycles and then replacing the oil. Any insight would be appreciated. Thanks.
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Re: New Camshaft Break-in procedure.

Postby zero06 » Sat Sep 08, 2012 12:08 am

you should always use break in oil first and baby it. depending on the composition of the metal a variety of problems can occur. keeping the metal at certain temps and frictions the first times it sees heat is crucial to how the metal will react to future stresses. wether it will matter in your case :shrug:
as of right now... whats done is done.
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Re: New Camshaft Break-in procedure.

Postby zero06 » Sat Sep 08, 2012 12:21 am

ductile steel depending on the grade is very abrasion/deformation resistant but has compensated fracture resistance. I've seen 8"dia sch.160 ductile steel pipe shatter like a glass tube. but obviously that's a different (specialty) composition ductile for high friction. basically what you should be worried about is the cams snapping. but as long as you let them heat up, (slowly and not too hot!/low revs) and stay hot for a decent period of time with a slow cool down you'll probably be fine.
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Re: New Camshaft Break-in procedure.

Postby ZeroDrift » Sat Sep 08, 2012 2:29 am

This is what I'd do: Break in additives to your existing oil.

Zinc and phosphorous help protect against sheering actions from cam over valves. http://www.redlineoil.com/product.aspx?pid=121&pcid=1
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Re: New Camshaft Break-in procedure.

Postby C-dubb » Sat Sep 08, 2012 4:23 am

Thanks for the info, ZeroDrift & zero06

The first time start was a good 5-10 minute Idle time. A few shut down and starts with the same Idle time after that. After I believed everything was in good working order, I took a slow run through the gears, no high RPM's. I have taken a few good rips through the gears but always with several minutes of cool down time. All of this has been with synthetic oil. My concern was that the info included with the cams stated that it should all be done with conventional oil.

I've also read that I should be concerned with "flat spots" on lobes when breaking in camshafts on flat tappet assemblies.
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