RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Roreri » Fri Apr 22, 2022 7:51 pm

I got both of the rear sway bar link bolts off. The Devil will come for my soul some sunny afternoon while I am out on a drive in the Lorelei I fear.

I have both of the rears installed. A couple of observations:

1. Yes that sway bar nut was confusing as hell for a while. I was like “I’m turning and turning and nothing’s happening.” Then I took a closer look at it and knew what to do. I guess I got lucky in that the nut and bolt weren’t hard fuzed to each other. Some PB Blaster on it and an hour to let it work in did the trick.

2. A jack under the rear wheel assembly allowed me to get into position to put it back together.

3. For the love of all that is holy do not dislodge the brake pad from the caliper and then inadvertently compress the caliper like a clod unless you have a desire to learn what needing three hands is like and you have some sizable C clamps on hand.

4. The brake line bracket on the 441 is a pain in the ass. One, it’s positioned in such a way as to suggest that their rubber o-ring around the brake line solution is good. It would allow the brake line to vibrate and I’m not of the opinion that it’s a good idea to diverge from the system of hard fixing the brake line at the junction using the C clip which has allowed my brake lines to survive 30 years. Two, if you think as I do, you’re going to have to do some bending, clip manipulation, and swearing in a tight space.

Here's how it looks after installing the rears. Wow, that back is a little high.

Coilovers Installed.JPG

24 and 13/16" ground to front fender
27 and 1/8" ground to rear fender (2 and 5/16" rake front to back)

My initial impressions are that I'll go down 1/2" in the front, and down 1" or 1 and 1/2" in the back. Though frankly I have no major issues with it as it is. I might wait until I get the CF hood and lightweight battery installed--that will relieve the front end of about 60lbs which might change my equation some.

Front camber is set to maximum allowable, which is roughly what I had before with the Cusco pillowball camber plates.

For information's sake:

To get 24 and 13/16" ground to fender on the front, with 205/50R16 tires, the bottom of the threaded tube should be recessed into the lower receiver 1 and 1/4"

To get 27 and 1/8" ground to fender on the rear, with 205/50R16 tires, the bottom of the threaded tube should be recessed into the lower receiver 3 and 1/4" (if I would have done some math, I would have known that the rake would be in excess of 2 inches. Duh on my part. I was distracted.)

The 6km test drive went without problems. The ride quality is improved and no more noises--in general--from the suspension. Caveat below. I have no major complaints. Some aspects of the install could have gone a little smoother--my main complaint is the brake line brackets which were a little hassle for my preferences. I didn't paint the calipers and rotors on the rear--and boy you sure can tell by the rusty rotor!

One thing I will say, the front coilovers are talky at low speed. Grinding noises. Even with the radial bearings that promised to eliminate that. I don't know whether I need to do something to fix that, or whether I just need to get used to it. I'd appreciate some advice on that because it's annoying to have spent $100 extra to have that. I sounds jank.

EDIT: I quickly assessed that the CV joints were likely the source of these noises and will replace the CV axles.

Hopefully, my account will be of use to the other members who got in on the group buy.
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Last edited by Roreri on Sat Apr 23, 2022 11:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Tippo » Fri Apr 22, 2022 10:16 pm

Roreri wrote:The clips didn't fly off so I can be grateful for that. After some fiddling, I was able to get the brake pad back in, but now I have this issue.

Misaligned.JPG

The inboard pad seems recessed, and the caliper cannot come out any more. The result is that I cannot put the caliper back on the rotor. I'm working it.


Calipers are on the sliding pins, move those out a little and you can adjust. If the inside pad is too far out, you need to grab a C clamp or caliper depressor and spin it back in. Pro tip: pop the reservoir open when you do it.

edit: looks like you got it done. congrats!


Roreri wrote:One thing I will say, the front coilovers are talky at low speed. Grinding noises. Even with the radial bearings that promised to eliminate that. I don't know whether I need to do something to fix that, or whether I just need to get used to it. I'd appreciate some advice on that because it's annoying to have spent $100 extra to have that. I sounds jank.

Hopefully, my account will be of use to the other members who got in on the group buy.


What do you mean by "talky" by the way? You check your rotor shields to make sure it wasn't rubbing? If they squeak that could be it, check your bolts too, make sure everything is tight.
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1992 ST185 Celica All-Trac Turbo 4th Gen 3SGTE Swap. Teal Metallic. "Lazarus"
1990 ST185 Cellica All-Trac Turbo. Grey Metallic. "Mirum"
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Roreri » Fri Apr 22, 2022 11:07 pm

Tippo wrote:What do you mean by "talky" by the way? You check your rotor shields to make sure it wasn't rubbing? If they squeak that could be it, check your bolts too, make sure everything is tight.


They pop and grind. Exactly the way they shouldn’t with radial bearings.

I will do all of that which you recommend.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby underscore » Sat Apr 23, 2022 1:07 am

Yeah definitely check everything over, I had a clunk that I thought was my BCs that was actually the rear LCA nut being loose.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Roreri » Sat Apr 23, 2022 9:48 pm

I went and got the Lorelei aligned after installing the Feal 441 coilover set. Since I used the $100 Gift certificate it won at a Cars and Coffee last October that was only $21.

I discovered that the outboard left CV boot was busted, so I was going to use a Dorman split CV boot kit to replace the boot. I got the outer left CV boot off, and saw that the CV joint was still well packed with grease. But then as I was down there looking around, I saw that both inboard CV boots are cracked. So, I'll be doing both front axles. I'm advised this will be a couple hour job and to break the 6 Allen head bolts loose first before anything else. I think in the end it will just be time saved down the road to replace the CV axles and get new rubber down there.

And, that might have been the sound I was hearing when turning the wheel at low speeds, as opposed to the coilovers, though I only really started noticing it when I changed to the coilovers.

At least I'll get the money back for the Dorman split CV boot kit.

One great thing about having a Celica is that there's a video about how to do this from a Celica fan:

https://youtu.be/bH98nX8fb6M

I was initially looking at a pair of CarQuest #NCV69511 units, but only one was available nearby.

I found these NAPA NCV944000 units which I can pick up on Monday:

CV Axles.JPG

That gives me all week plus the coming weekend to get them replaced prior to my planned road trip on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

AllTrac Lyfe.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Tippo » Sun Apr 24, 2022 1:11 pm

I picked some up at rock Auto for $55 a piece or so, Tecker recommended. https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.ph ... 94&pt=2288

surprisingly good amount of items for our cars listed. obviously the rear is much more difficult to get.
1992 SW20 MR2 Turbo 4th Gen 3SGTE Swap. Aquamarine Pearl. "Priscilla"
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Roreri » Sun Apr 24, 2022 2:51 pm

Oh that's great! I cancelled that NAPA part order and switched over to that RockAuto part.

You saved me $88 Tippo--thanks so much!

It's sad to hear about the rears being hard to get. I'll start looking now against the day of need.

I got after the rear calipers and rotors and brass brushed, sanded, degreased, Ospho-ed, and painted them. Not a super pro job but better looking then before for sure. My neighbor came over and was duly amazed (that I would be giving so much attention to an old car, no doubt).

Calipers and Rotors Painted 24 April 2022.JPG

The brakes appear to be the stock setup, as I knew from before. Single pot calipers, with the 277mm front rotor and the smaller rear rotor. They're fine. Not great, not terrible. It's good that I'm lightening up the Lorelei.

Front and Rear Calipers and Rotors.JPG

My plan tomorrow and Tuesday is to take off the CV axles and be ready to go when new CV axles arrive from RockAuto Tuesday evening. Onward!
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Roreri » Tue Apr 26, 2022 12:57 am

Like RedCelicaTRD warned me, Lakeland Toyota didn't actually have and couldn't find the parts I ordered on the 8th of April and sent me an email to that effect.

Wanting to get the internal structure repair parts on the way, I placed an order with Amayama:

53205-20030 Support Sub Assembly, Radiator, Upper $186.64
53292-20050 Seal, Radiator Support, Upper $40.96
Shipping: $32.49 (UPS)
Total: $260.09

The order is pending approval, and the prices might change depending on shipping costs and so on. The website says that the parts will be delivered to the warehouse on May 7. I received an email that a representative will reach out to me with payment instructions—so I haven’t actually paid for this yet.

I then placed an order with MegaZip for the other parts I need:

53209-20200 Brace Sub-Assembly, Hood Lock Support $31.15 (Japan Warehouse)
53633-20010 Shield, Hood Lock Control Cable, Toyota $34.59 (Japan Warehouse)
53903-20010 Panel Sub-Assembly, Front End $148.69 (Japan Warehouse)
Shipping (Japan Warehouse Items): $41.55 (FedEx Priority)
Total: $255.98

This order has been paid for, and MegaZip is actioning it. The parts are estimated to arrive between May 5 and May 13.

Total cost for both orders came to $516.07.

I should hope that these actually are in stock and arrive by late May. Obviously there's Memorial Day and I have some leave planned in early June so I could tear apart the front end and get all the bent metal replaced with undamaged parts and get the radiator back in its original position. Then, pretty much, minus a slightly scuffed OEM CS bumper, I'd consider it fully restored.

EDIT: And overnight, the other shoe dropped. Shipping for the MegaZip order is actually $151.51, so an additional $109.96 to get those on their way. I can expect worse for the Amayama order, I’m sure…

EDIT: MegaZip applied a 10% discount to my order so I only paid an additional $89 for shipping. Amayama adjusted the shipping up about $20. So that’s not too bad. MegaZip uses FedEx as its cheapest shipping option while Anayama uses EMS. All told about $630 for those parts, shipped.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Roreri » Fri Apr 29, 2022 1:02 am

CV Axle Replacement

A month ago, if someone had told me I was going to install coilovers and replace CV axles, I would have said "Hahahahahah no."

But these cars do something to you. Faced with a failed outer CV boot and cracked inner CV boots on both sides, and the CV joint grinding, I realized that I was either going to do it or pay to have someone do it. So I got it done. It look much longer than I would have liked, consuming three evenings after work, but I learned a lot and I bought some more tools. It's a job that a determined rookie with some basic background in wrenching can do, and it's a shitload better than paying hundreds of dollars to have it done.

I got a pair of TrakMotive CV axles (Tecker recommended!) from Rock Auto for $55 each plus shipping if you expedite them.

New CV Axle.JPG

Things you will need:

Metric Socket Set
30mm Axle Nut Socket
Impact Wrench
Breaker Bar
8mm Hex Socket
Tie Rod Remover (you might be able to get away without one--I didn't need it for one, but needed it for the other)
Extension (if you go with the impact wrench method of removing the hex bolts from the CV axle)
General tools like hammers and pliers and such

My recommended order of operations:

0. The day before, apply penetrating oil to the CV axle nut, the castle nut at the tie rod, strut bolts, caliper bolts, and the hex bolts attaching the CV axles to the transmission.

1. While the car is on ramps and chocked, with 8mm hex socket remove the 6 hex bolts (which should be at 48 foot pounds torque) attaching the existing CV axles to the transmission. Alternately, this can be done later with an impact wrench and an extension, like this:

Impact Wrench Method.JPG

2. Remove the CV axle nut from the center of the rotor--an impact wrench is very helpful for this.

3. Loosen the tie rod castle nut and remove the tie rod end (you may need a tie rod remover).

4. Remove caliper and place on bucket or hang from strut spring (I found this better).

5. Remove strut bolts.

6. Swing axle assembly out and remove old CV axle.

Old CV Axle Removed.JPG

7. Apply grease generously to new CV axle inner gearing.

8. Insert outer CV axle into wheel bearing (outboard hub), hand tightening new (or old) CV axle nut.

9. Replace and tighten strut bolts, tie rod castle nut, and replace caliper on knuckle and rotor.

10. Hand tighten hex bolts securing CV axle to the transmission.

11. Put tires back on without center hub cap and secure with three hand tightened lug nuts, then drop the car.

12. Tighten CV axle nut with breaker bar while tires are chocked, being watchful to locate the cotter pin hole where there is a gap if you use the new CV axle nut provided.

13. Jack car back up, remove tires, put the hub cap back on.

14. Insert and set cotter pin in CV axle nut.

15. Tires back on.

16. Get car up on ramps, chock, use torque wrench to tighten CV axle hex bolts to 48 foot pounds of torque.

I found the overall experience affirming, because in my growing opinion, to own and operate an AllTrac or GT-Four is to be both a driver and a technician. Unless you either want to eventually just have a garage or lawn ornament, or you have inordinately deep pockets for mechanics' charges.
Last edited by Roreri on Fri Apr 29, 2022 6:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby underscore » Fri Apr 29, 2022 1:21 am

Roreri wrote:It's a job that a determined rookie with some basic background in wrenching can do, and it's a shitload better than paying hundreds of dollars to have it done.


One of the things that I love about these cars, and part of what has kept me from changing platforms, is that every* job I've come across is doable by a home mechanic with fairly standard tools. Quite often you do need to remove a couple more parts than on other cars, so it takes more time and would have higher shop bills, but it's all quite reasonable to do.

*the exception is probably installing the transmission. which people can do at home, but you're pulling the whole engine and it's a much bigger job than on most other cars. idk how it compares to other AWD cars though.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby alltracman78 » Sat Apr 30, 2022 1:44 am

I'm a little late to the party, but a couple of suggestions for this job.

1-Tie rod remover. Not sure which tool you used. I wouldn't suggest a pickle fork. They beat up the boot, force grease out of the boot, and can potentially mar the joint. You can use a large hammer to whack the outside of the steering knuckle HARD where the tie rod sits. If you do this make sure you loosen and remove the tie rod nut first. Turn it upside down (so the crenelations on the castle nut are facing down) and thread it back on til the top of the threads are even with the bottom of the upside down nut. You don't want it threaded all the way down because this leaves the top of the threads unprotected. And you won't know when you've loosened the tie rod (it will fall out of the hole). The nut goes back on so if you miss and hit the threads they're protected. And the nut is upside down because if you do hit the nut you're less apt to distort the crenelations if they're fully supported (the thread tapers at the top). I hope that makes sense?
It also doesn't hurt to get a new castle nut.
The preferred way is using a Toyota SST. Looks kind of like a 2 jaw puller. There are aftermarket ones too. Make sure you get a good one. That fits. Make sure it's lined up straight. You don't want all that pressure sideways (like in a press). This can break the tool or damage the tie rod.

This is an aftermarket one, one of the Toyota ones is similar (there are several, depending which vehicle you're doing, and they are different).
https://www.yotatech.com/forums/attachm ... 03fdcf.jpg

There's supposed to be a cork gasket between the spacer on the end of the CV shaft and the "cup" end that stays in the transmission. This keeps the grease from escaping out the joint.

BLUE thread lock is great for those hex bolts in the driveshaft. You don't want them getting loose.....

If you tighten the 2 strut bolts on the top of the steering knuckle when it's hanging in the air you get less negative camber. You want more negative camber.
Push in on the top of the knuckle while you tighten. Or use something to hold it in while you tighten if you need 3 hands. Like a jack under the ball joint.


Oh, and NEVER NEVER NEVER use something like that split Dorman boot. Unless it's an emergency fix you're going to correct as soon as you can. Complete crap....
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Roreri » Sat Apr 30, 2022 2:43 am

Underscore: That is great to hear that as long as you have some tools and determination these are not self maintenance nightmares. Except maybe for finding the parts. I might consider doing the AC compressor, receiver dryer, and union O-rings as my next major project.

Alltracman78: Late or not, thank you! Much appreciated.

I used the sort of tie rod remover that involves a C-shaped clamp that you put on and then you use a socket wrench to twist a threaded rod up to push the tie rod up through the hole until it pops. This kinda guy, just like the yotatech tool you linked:

Tie Rod Puller.JPG

It did line up and it worked. The other side, I used a poly hammer and the tie rod came up out of the hole very easily without any undue banging and damage to the castle nut.

I did not use blue thread locker for the CV axle hex bolts. Too late now, unless I want to take the time to get down there and re-apply it. There were no gaskets in there with the OEM CV axles, so I didn't look for new gaskets. I even used the original hex bolts, because I didn't poke around in the box and find the bag with gaskets and new hex bolts until after it was all together. So, I guess the 48 foot pounds of torque have to be enough. I did use a drop of blue thread locker for the brake caliper bolts and the strut bolts. I did end up using one new hex bolt because one of the hex bolts, I marred it a little removing it with the impact wrench.

I'll get down there and check the CV axle hex bolts frequently over this trip I am going on. If I see anything I'll get on it in a hurry. I'll take an impact wrench to check torque, socket wrench, 8mm hex socket, blue thread locker, and extra hex nuts with me on my trip so I have everything I need on hand to correct anything untoward.

I didn't lose any negative camber, so I must have done the strut bolts right.

The split Dorman boot went by the wayside pretty quickly--plus they're hilariously expensive! Glad I just bit the bullet and replaced the CV axles. It takes a lot of effort to cut a CV boot off--might as well just do the whole axle.
Last edited by Roreri on Wed May 04, 2022 1:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Roreri » Tue May 03, 2022 11:09 pm

Blue Ridge Parkway Road Trip Day One

Yesterday morning the boy and I set out from Alexandria on a five day four night road trip with the Lorelei. We moved through Manassas, Warrenton, Sperryville, Madison, Hood, Geer, and Crozet, always favoring the twisty roads over the straightaways.

The weird tenderness started setting in just as I started moving from Hood to Geer, about two and a half hours and 110 miles into the trip. It would feel like it just did not want to give it the full measure. The motor would cut out, ever so slightly. My reaction was to drive it light, which it was fine to do. I watched air:fuel and it was fine. Coolant temps were normal. I noticed oil temps were just above 200 degrees F which is slightly higher than normal--the oil temp tends to like to range from 180-200 degrees F once it's heated up. It wasn't a really hot day. I was at that time at just about a half tank of Shell 93 octane.

We got to Waynesboro, had lunch, and I went to Advance and got a bottle of Lucas octane boost. We went and dumped it in the tank and filled up with 8 Gallons of Shell 93 Octane. It ran fine the rest of the day. Attacked hills, ran to full boost, the whole thing. I ended up just turning the boost controller off because not so much power was needful under the circumstances.

Anyway, clearly my problems are not quite over. I’ll pull the ECU. And if that proves fine I'll change the fuel pump when I get home. Probably I'll get the Supra pump, even though I have an OEM Denso unit on hand, just so I can be certain sure I'm getting the lpm to service the full 16psi boost.

If you're ever going to drive the Blue Ridge Parkway, drive it in early May on a weekday. You will feel like you own the whole road.

Roreri on the Blue Ridge Parkway 2 May.JPG

The Feals are great. I mostly respected the speed limit. I took corners while holding the speed limit—which is to say faster than the recommended speed. It stuck to the road very well, even with 205 wide all seasons. I can only imagine how well it would stick dropping it an inch and going to 215 wide Bridgestone Potenza RS-71RS high performance summer tires and lightweight Enkei wheels.

Blue Ridge Parkway Road Trip Day Two

We started at Peaks of Otter Lodge and went to Bedford to see the National D-Day Memorial. Powerful monument to that day.

The Lorelei gave great performance all day long. Great pulls up hills, the whole serving of beans. There was a detour off the the Blue Ridge Parkway where I got to haul ass with a couple of other cars up a very curvy three lane stretch south of Roanoake on Bent Mountain Road, and it was admirable in both power and agility.

Bent Mountain Road.JPG

Finished up in Floyd, VA. 604km thus far. Wednesday and Thursday southward, then the long day home on the expressways.
Last edited by Roreri on Sat May 07, 2022 4:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby Roreri » Sat May 07, 2022 4:06 am

Blue Ridge Parkway Road Trip Day Three

On the 4th of May we continued south to West Jefferson, North Carolina, by way of Mabry Mill, Puckett Cabin, Brinegar Cabin, Cascade Falls at EB Jeffress Park, and the Moses Cone Estate. Performance was generally good over the 260 or so kilometers driven. Nothing really stood out that caused consternation.

Blue Ridge Parkway Road Trip Day Four

On the 5th of May we continued south on the Blue Ridge Parkway. We summited two peaks that day, first Grandfather Mountain, and then Mount Mitchell. I wish I could say that performance was flawless, but I observed some real problems with occasional power cutout over the long, nearly 350km day. The Lorelei was still able to climb, though. I snapped this amazing shot from atop Grandfather Mountain.

Atop_Grandfather_Mountain.JPG

Got another glamour shot at Switzerland Inn North Carolina:

Roreri at Switzerland Inn Chalet 5 May 2029.JPG

Return Leg

The 6th of May we did a 750km endurance trip through the fog and rain. The Lorelei would perform fine for a while, and then the cutouts would begin--the car would keep going, and it was never an issue of stalling out, but it was rendered gutless. This happened most embarrassingly while cruising along with a 370Z on Interstate 77 north just before the interchange with Interstate 81.

However, I was able to correct these through the simple expedient of pulling over, cutting the engine, and starting it again. This would correct the problem, either for a short time as I observed earlier in the trip, or for a long time, as I observed after shutting it down shortly in Christiansburg VA. Shortly after, I topped off with 11 Gallons of non-ethanol Shell 93 octane. For the remainder of the trip—about 420km—the Lorelei exhibited flawless performance. We returned home the evening of the 6th of May, having clocked 1943km over five days. Car, driver, and occupant survived.

Thoughts on the Intermittent Power Cutout Problem

The fact that I can correct the power cutout problem by shutting the motor down and starting it back up is interesting to me. I'll look at the ECU as recommended. I'll install a fuel pressure gauge off the top of the banjo bolt at the fuel filter with an extension line and clip it to the windshield wiper so I can look at it while testing. Could be the fuel pump, though somehow I doubt it, now. Could be the AFM, too, I'm told. Deleting that old tech is as good a reason as any to install a standalone ECU, I suppose.

Could it be as simple a matter as ethanol-laced fuel fuckering up the situation?

MegaZip Problems

I came home to a message from MegaZip which informed me that the three parts I ordered from them would require 2-3 months to source through their Thailand warehouse and an additional $420.91, making the total cost for the three parts in excess of $700. I told them that this was not acceptable and asked them to return the $344.49 I had sent them.

AllTrac Life...
Last edited by Roreri on Sat May 07, 2022 1:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: RORERI: A JDM 1992 ST185H-BLMVZ

Postby underscore » Sat May 07, 2022 4:37 am

That sounds similar to when I had a bad knock sensor, I got really good at clutch in, engine off, engine on, clutch out, while driving lol. I can't remember if the CEL comes on with that or not. Since the problem went away after refueling then I'd suspect some kind of problem with the fuel you got at the previous fill up. I'd wait to see if it comes back before worrying too too much about it.
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